Beston, Full Speed Ahead. Tales from the Log of a Correspondent with Our Navy.

Beston, Henry B.

Full Speed Ahead. Tales from the Log of a Correspondent with Our Navy. [Inscribed Association copy from Henry B. Beston to Admiral William Sowden Sims – with original typescript in an envelope that is tipped into the pastedown / It is a typescript of a letter that was written during Beston’s time as editor at the magazine “The Living Age” (an offshoot of ‘Atlantic Monthly’) and stunningly also reflects on Beston’s classmate, Theodore Roosevelt, whom he obviously gave a copy of this book and according to Beston’s letter to Sims, Theodore Roosevelt and his children confirming that they enjoyed it. The letter reveals that Beston sends this book as a “thank you” to Admiral Sims for his time as war correspondent under Sims’ command during World War I. The typescript of the letter must be seen as an extension to Beston’s Preface in the book in which he writes: “And no acknowledgment, no matter how studied or courtly, its phrasing, can express what I owe to Admiral Sims for the friendliness of my reception, for his care that i be shown all the Navy’s activities, and for his constant and kindly effort to advance my work in every possible way.”

First Edition. New York, Doubleday, 1919. Octavo. XIII, 254 pages. Original Hardcover in protective Mylar. Very good + condition with only minor signs of external wear. Signed and inscribed by Henry B. Beston with a letter typescript to Admiral William Sowden Sims. The inscription reads: “To Admiral Sims with every grateful good wish of the author – Henry Beston Sheahan – 1919”.

Henry Beston (June 1, 1888 – April 15, 1968) was an American writer and naturalist, best known as the author of The Outermost House, written in 1928. Born Henry Beston Sheahan in Boston, he grew up in Quincy, Massachusetts with his parents, Dr. Joseph Sheahan and Marie Louise (Maurice) Beston Sheahan, and brother George. Beston attended Adams Academy in Quincy before earning his B.A. (1909) and M.A. (1911) from Harvard College. After leaving Harvard, Beston took up teaching at the University of Lyon. In 1914 he returned to Harvard as an English department assistant. Beston joined the French army in 1915 and served as an ambulance driver. His service in le Bois le Pretre and at the Battle of Verdun was described in his first book, A Volunteer Poilu. In 1918, Beston became a press representative for the U.S. Navy. Highlights from this period include being the only American correspondent to travel with the British Grand Fleet and to be aboard an American destroyer during combat engagement and sinking. His second book of journalistic work, Full Speed Ahead, described these experiences. (Wikipedia).

EUR 2.400,-- 

Beston, Full Speed Ahead. Tales from the Log of  a Correspondent with Our Navy.
Beston, Full Speed Ahead. Tales from the Log of  a Correspondent with Our Navy.
Beston, Full Speed Ahead. Tales from the Log of  a Correspondent with Our Navy.
Beston, Full Speed Ahead. Tales from the Log of  a Correspondent with Our Navy.
Beston, Full Speed Ahead. Tales from the Log of  a Correspondent with Our Navy.
Beston, Full Speed Ahead. Tales from the Log of  a Correspondent with Our Navy.
Beston, Full Speed Ahead. Tales from the Log of  a Correspondent with Our Navy.
Beston, Full Speed Ahead. Tales from the Log of  a Correspondent with Our Navy.
Beston, Full Speed Ahead. Tales from the Log of  a Correspondent with Our Navy.
Beston, Full Speed Ahead. Tales from the Log of  a Correspondent with Our Navy.