Coke, The First Part of the Institutes of the Lawes [Laws] of England or a Comme

Coke, Edward / [John Rix] / [John Daynes].

The First Part of the Institutes of the Lawes [Laws] of England or a Commentary upon Littleton, not the name of the Author only, but of the Law it selfe [itself]. [With “A Table to the First Part of the Institutes of the Lawes of England – Alphabetically composed”].

The Fourth Edition, corrected. London, Printed by M.F.I.H. and R.T. Assignes of I. More Esquire, 1639. 20 cm x 28.7 cm. Woodcut – Titlepage of Sir Edward Coke by John Payne, [4], 395 leaves numbered consecutively on the rectos only, resulting in 790 pages plus 30 unnumbered pages of Index (collation complete). Hardcover / Wonderfully restored reverse leather on five raised bands with new spine-label. Original endpapers (restored) with ink annotations and name of preowner “John Daynes”. Several annotations throughout the book. Manuscript ownership inscription of John Daynes and John Rix stud. (dated 1729) to endpaper and halftitle. Signs of old (now restored), Dampstains to endpaper and pastedowns. Some faded dampstains to the outer margins of some of the pages. Paper margins professionally restored. Rare ! After the fantastic restoration this is now a very good condition of this rare version of Coke’s masterpiece on English Law !

The Institutes of the Lawes of England are a series of legal treatises written by Sir Edward Coke. They were first published, in stages, between 1628 and 1644. Widely recognized as a foundational document of the common law, they have been cited in over 70 cases decided by the Supreme Court of the United States, including several landmark cases. For example, in Roe v. Wade (1973), Coke’s Institutes are cited as evidence that under old English common law, an abortion performed before quickening was not an indictable offence. In the much earlier case of United States v. E. C. Knight Co. (1895), Coke’s Institutes are quoted at some length for their definition of monopolies. The Institutes’s various reprinted editions well into the 19th century is a clear indication of the long lasting value placed on this work throughout especially the 18th century in Britain and Europe. It has also been associated through the years with high literary connections. For example, David Hume in 1764 requested it from the bookseller Andrew Millar in a cheap format for a French friend. (Wikipedia)

EUR 1.800,-- 

Coke, The First Part of the Institutes of the Lawes [Laws] of England or a Commentary upon Littleton
Coke, The First Part of the Institutes of the Lawes [Laws] of England or a Comme
Coke, The First Part of the Institutes of the Lawes [Laws] of England or a Comme
Coke, The First Part of the Institutes of the Lawes [Laws] of England or a Comme
Coke, The First Part of the Institutes of the Lawes [Laws] of England or a Comme
Coke, The First Part of the Institutes of the Lawes [Laws] of England or a Comme
Coke, The First Part of the Institutes of the Lawes [Laws] of England or a Comme
Coke, The First Part of the Institutes of the Lawes [Laws] of England or a Comme