[Epictetus] Carter, All the Works of Epictetus, which are now Extant; Consisting

[Epictetus] Carter, Elizabeth.

All the Works of Epictetus, which are now Extant; Consisting of his Discourses, preserved by Arrian, in Four Books, The Enchiridion and Fragments. Translated from the Original Greek by Elizabeth Carter. With Introduction and Notes by the Translator.

The Third Edition. In Two Volumes (complete set). London, Printed for J.and F.Rivington, at the Bible and Crown, 1768. Small Octavo (10,5 cm x 16,5 cm). [4], XLII, [2], 266, [3], 340, [7] pages. Hardcover / Professionally rebacked to the style of the 18th century. Original boards, endpapers and inscriptions retained. Excellent condition with some minor signs of wear only. From the library of Hugh V. McCausland: “To my dear son Hugh on his 14th birthday from his affectionate Father 1917”. Other ownership notifications on titleship by one Mrs. Mead and R.F.McCausland (MCMI / 1901).

Elizabeth Carter (pen name Eliza; 16 December 1717 – 19 February 1806) was an English poet, classicist, writer, translator, linguist, and polymath. As one of the Bluestocking Circle that surrounded Elizabeth Montagu, she earned respect for the first English translation of the Discourses of Epictetus, by the 2nd-century Stoic philosopher. She also published poems and translated from French and Italian. Most of her other output took the form of correspondence to family and friends. Carter had many eminent friends and was close to Elizabeth Montagu, Hannah More, Hester Chapone and other Bluestocking members. Anne Hunter, a minor poet and socialite, and Mary Delany were also noted as close friends. She befriended Samuel Johnson, editing some editions of his periodical The Rambler.

The novelist Samuel Richardson included Carter’s poem “Ode to Wisdom” in the text of his novel Clarissa (1747–1848), but without ascribing it to her. It was later published in a corrected form in the Gentleman’s Magazine and Carter received an apology from Richardson. Elizabeth Gaskell, the 19th-century novelist, refers to Carter as an epistolatory model, bracketing her in Cranford with Hester Chapone, a self-taught Bluestocking. Virginia Woolf saw her as a feminist precursor – urging “homage to the robust shade of Eliza Carter – the valiant old woman who tied a bell to her bedstead in order that she might wake early and learn Greek.” (Wikipedia)

Epictetus (Epíktetos; c. 50 – c. 135 AD) was a Greek Stoic philosopher. He was born a slave at Hierapolis, Phrygia (present day Pamukkale, Turkey) and lived in Rome until his banishment, when he went to Nicopolis in northwestern Greece for the rest of his life. His teachings were written down and published by his pupil Arrian in his Discourses and Enchiridion.
Epictetus taught that philosophy is a way of life and not just a theoretical discipline. To Epictetus, all external events are beyond our control; we should accept whatever happens calmly and dispassionately. However, individuals are responsible for their own actions, which they can examine and control through rigorous self-discipline.
Epictetus gave European scholars of the Enlightenment an example of a system of ethics that was secular, based not on God’s law but on reason and observation of the natural world. (Wikipedia)

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[Epictetus] Elizabeth Carter, All the Works of Epictetus
[Epictetus] Elizabeth Carter, All the Works of Epictetus
[Epictetus] Elizabeth Carter, All the Works of Epictetus
[Epictetus] Elizabeth Carter, All the Works of Epictetus
[Epictetus] Elizabeth Carter, All the Works of Epictetus
[Epictetus] Elizabeth Carter, All the Works of Epictetus
[Epictetus] Elizabeth Carter, All the Works of Epictetus